College Park Plaza (location: Indianapolis, Indiana)
List of stores (32), shopping hours

Name: College Park Plaza
Address: 3535 W 86th St, Indianapolis, Indiana - IN 46268 (map)
Coordinates: 39.9090449, -86.2198234
City & State: Indianapolis, Indiana
# of stores: 32 » Go to the store list
Phone: Not Available
Email: Not Available
Web:

College Park Plaza rating:

4/5 (80 %), 2 votes

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College Park Plaza details

College Park Plaza shopping information - stores in mall (32), detailed hours of operations, directions with map and GPS coordinates. Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, 3535 W 86th St, Indianapolis, Indiana - IN 46268. Black Friday and holiday hours. Look at selection of great stores located in Midtown plaza and read reviews from customers and write your own review about your visit at the mall. Don't miss rate the mall. Phone: Not Available.

  • Number of stores in College Park Plaza: 32
  • Don't forget to write a review about visiting the College Park Plaza.

College Park Plaza hours of operations

Please note, operating hours might temporarily vary due to the new COVID-19 coronavirus.

Opening hours may vary by store. For information about opening hours please visit College Park Plaza.

College Park Plaza
Black Friday & Holiday hours »

College Park Plaza location, map

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Store directory and map of College Park Plaza

Plan of mall College Park Plaza

Write a review about College Park Plaza

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4 stars

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Read 2 reviews

  • College Park Plaza customer review by Adeline Nicholas

    - Oct 25, 2020

    Went to Walmart and Dollar Tree. Very nice stores.

  • College Park Plaza customer review by Michael Hallberg

    - Jun 02, 2018

    The College Park Shopping Center needs to do a better job keeping the walkways clear of solicitors. It is common to encounter young men selling candy bars or boxed candy out of cardboard boxes, wrapped candy with a commercial pickle container for a donation jar, or simply asking for cash. Today, though, was a first. Two monstrous African-American men, in front of Rainbow clothing and Dollar Tree, were throwing derogatory and offending language at me in hopes of me reacting. Sideline comments, about what was seen in the Wal-Mart bags, makes me wonder if assault and theft would have happened if they saw more than basic groceries. It is activities like this that have prevented me from shopping at the stores, opting to steer clear of these people.

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